Prompt Thursday. Holidays. 

Today’s Prompt Thursday

In the UK headlines have been made about parents taking their children out of school at term time to take them abroad on a holiday.

Do you have children, would you take them out of school to take them on holiday?

Have you been taken out of school to go on holiday?

Where is your favourite place to go on holiday? 

Chapbooks. La La Love and Popcorn. Katie Lewington. 

Share on Twitter or Facebook,  and get 25% off my chapbooks La La Love and Popcorn. 

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A chapbook of poetry on the universal theme of love. 

The poetry in La La Love contains observations of love from first meeting, possession, lust, falling in love, and being in an established relationship.

https://payhip.com/b/HhLw

Hungry?

If not, you may well be by the time you have finished reading this food themed chapbook, written by Katie Lewington.

The witty poetry on mould, snotty noses, sell by dates, and food shopping is accompanied by full colour food pictures. 

Spotlight. Dark Angel. Amanda Jones. 

With this fallen angel it never felt so good to be bad!

Genre Paranormal/Fantasy Romance
Publisher New Concepts Publishing

Amazon

Blurb

Katia may be a celebrated musician, but she’d always felt a little like an outsider looking in. Who knew that being abducted by a handsome stranger would set her on a crash course with her destiny…
Luc has spent an eternity keeping everyone and everything at a distance as an unstoppable darkness consumes his soul. Will his beautiful captive be his salvation, or will they both be consumed by the ultimate evil…

About the Author

Amanda Jones lives in Toronto with her exceptionally spoiled pets.  Aside from sharing her crazy imagination with others through her books Amanda enjoys travelling and frequent Netflix binges.  Amanda has worked in several fields including sports, music, film, corporate human resources, and is a graduate of York University and Sheridan College.

Website Facebook @AmandaLJ1981

 

17 Very Funny Very Short Stories: Volume 1: FunnyInFiveHundred.com Flash Fiction Collection. 

FunnyInFiveHundred.com strives to be the funniest, silliest literary website around. We publish funny flash fiction in under 500 words, and our writers deliver!

We’ve been around for more than a year now. More than five hundred submissions later, this first issue showcases 17 stories that received the most praise on our website. These authors did not let genre or convention hold them back. Expect to laugh at a story about zombies, then laugh at a story about mysterious goats, and then never guess what’s coming next.

Authors in this volume include: Clyde Always, Winnie Khaw, Steve Sibra, Robert L. Martin, Ariela Zucker, Severely Odd, Aubrey Bjork, Riss Ryker, Joe Portes, Aubrey Bjork, Riss Ryker, Joe Portes, Elizabeth Byron, Tyson Abaroa, Ellen J. Perry, Joe Novarra, Katie Lewington, Jon Penfold, Linda M. Crate, and Christopher Gonzalez.

Get a free copy of this book, featuring my story The Smell in the Library.

Amazon.com 

Giveaway. Put Me Down, I’m Terrible. Katie Lewington. 

You can enter my giveaway on Goodreads.com to win a paperback copy of Put me Down, I’m Terrible.  

In Put Me Down I’m Terrible, Katie Lewington explores mundanity: a couple making love in a car, a woman preparing for a date, a donut shop. But to say these occurrences are mundane is only half the story. In poetry as achingly familiar as it is uncharted, Lewington feeds readers scenes of fumbling vulnerability, teeth-clenching honesty, and unrelenting self-awareness. There’s something in every poem that rings true; the awkward intimacy of a dentist appointment, the doldrum of Mondays, the inexorable journey of stray hairs. But Lewington takes these occurrences further, with precision as sharp as a knife, making the familiar strange and shaking up the norm. A walk of shame becomes a woman’s sphere for agency. Cold sores become a badge of power. New shoes, an insufficient patch. Uncompromisingly honest and hauntingly explorative, Put Me Down I’m Terrible is a celebration of the now, the everyday life, and the vulnerability that comes with it. As Lewington pens in one of the poems, “I don’t need to journey I’m gonna celebrate where I’m at.” Each poem is a celebration, and the collection, a festival unto itself.