My Book Round up for January. 

Pet SemataryPet Sematary by Stephen King

My rating: 3 of 5 stars

Well, I needed a book to help drop me off to sleep, and Pet Sematary by Stephen King did that. What few books I’ve read of King his books do have some similarities, such as having an excellent core idea, and then moving away from it.

I was on page two hundred and four of this book and I wondered where the story was going. We have a nice enough family, kind neighbours, a hazardous road, and a resurrected cat. Then we change gears and the tenses change, King hints that terrible things are going to happen, and so they do: Gage, the infant son of the family, dies. I found at this point Pet Sematary became difficult to read, as I felt the raw grief of Gage’s family.

In the end the book boils down to Gage’s father Louis’ inner battle to bring his son back to life, courtesy of sacred land. Gage becomes a Chucky type character and the story with shades of Frankenstein.

Why do I return to King’s books likes a moth to a flame?

I like his storytelling, and that his characters are ordinary folk with their own foibles, with well observed emotions and incidents that occur in family life, and in relationships. His books feel comfortable, until King whacks up the tension, then it’s plain unsettling to read.

I am planning to read more of King’s books in 2018. That is my reading goal this year, so I won’t give up yet. Although I did, overall, feel meh about Pet Sematary.

Also with this being written over thirty years ago there are racist jokes, and the word mongoloids, which is abhorrent.

View all my reviews

Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children (Miss Peregrine’s Peculiar Children, #1)Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children by Ransom Riggs

My rating: 4 of 5 stars

First of all, there’s so much to love about this book! I read it in one sitting. I love the photographs that are included, especially of the children, strange, and haunting photographs, which in an interview with the author included in the back of the book Riggs says were a part of the writing process,

‘ultimately the photos and the story influenced each other,’

I like the island setting, the time travel, the changeling elements of the peculiar children, and the historical backdrop against World War Two too. The story of Jacob’s grandfather, and Emma, the romance that couldn’t be, I found to be a touching part of the story.

The story itself was thin on the ground. There were parts that could have been extended, or written better. The rush of detail, threat, and action towards the end of the book was dizzying, but overall the feel of the story, the world(s) Riggs created, was enthralling.

View all my reviews

Charcoal mist at cotton fields: Poetry & DrawingsCharcoal mist at cotton fields: Poetry & Drawings by Eden Sleepwalker

My rating: 4 of 5 stars

Chapter One are poems of our elements: the night, the moon, the sky, the sea.

Chapter Two is darker, deeper, taking us into the psyche of a mind, with mention of carousels, dollhouses, and dreams.

“burying words, onto pages

the cover of the darkness of the night,”

Chapter Three are love poems in a guise of shared possession, such as in Shelters, and The Pulse, an erotic highlight in this chapter.
The imagery coupled with the senses made me shiver with delight. There are fantastic metaphors too, and observations. Unnerving as well in some parts. With a wonderful end note.

A Raw Meat’s song is a particular highlight, and Each Other’s Eyes is as perfect as a poem can be.

I also love the illustrations in this book! Eden is a talented woman, for her words and her drawings that make this book a visual pleasure.

View all my reviews

Moon Full of MoonsMoon Full of Moons by Kat Lehmann

My rating: 4 of 5 stars

Outdoor persons, and deep-thinkers will enjoy this book of poetry, in which is the minuit of our natural world. A breath of fresh air, as if sinking into the serene calm we feel when stood on the beach, with the sea lapping at our feet, and having left the concrete jungles behind. While many of the poems are observational, others are opinions of the writer, and matters of the heart are written about, as well as the moon, family, rebuilding, the earth, trees, and age.

“It is the move behind existing that starts living”

My highlights are Poems Peach and House for Sale.

The circle of life all in one volume, Moon Full of Moons is an enjoyable read and my review just doesn’t do it justice.

View all my reviews

Splintered with TerrorSplintered with Terror by Linda M Crate

For many this chapbook could possibly be triggering, as it covers sexual harassment, cat calling, and rape culture. I appreciate what must have gone into Linda’s poetry in this collection , and in sharing her experiences. I personally identified with the emotions of which she writes around her experiences, and I think Splintered with Terror is an important read because it is so relevant to our society. There are poems that recount incidents, others question our culture and reactions, as well as others that seemed to be open letters to those that stood by, and did nothing, but accuse the narrator of these poems. A few of the poems take place in college, where I think many of us are experiencing a newly discovered sexual awareness.

‘People should always

Respect each other’s boundaries,’

There are poems too, such as in Men like you, that make a very good point.

‘No means no

And people should be respected

For their decisions,’

What kicks in is a quality that I have noticed, and love about, Linda’s poetry is the uplift, the continuing on, and even referencing Harry Potter in Reliving Nightmares, ‘you are a foul loathsome little cockroach,’ There’s magic in her words. A line I loved was, ‘you’re the pomegranate stain on my heart,’

‘The best apology is changed behavior,’

View all my reviews

Bones in the GardenBones in the Garden by McKayla Debonis

My rating: 4 of 5 stars

I like the theme of this poetry collection of gardens, regrowth, and bones, and all the subjects they can represent. It’s well presented, with illustrations.

‘How can one man destroy the

Structure that holds me together?’

What McKayla does is plant seeds, and lays to rest the past, metaphorically layered, using plants: Wildflowers, poppies, trees: Weeping Willows, and animals: Bees.

‘I am more than scars etched in white,’

McKayla writes at the back of the book that these poems were written during an abusive relationship, and I think if anyone was going through that, and read this collection, they would find parallels, and it might help give them strength, and find their own voice again, which I think is really special.

Bones in the Garden is a curious collection of poetry, and uses many ideas. The imagery is superb.

View all my reviews

maroon daydreamsmaroon daydreams by cheyenne raine

My rating: 4 of 5 stars

Raine’s poetry ends in a final line, indicated by -, an example of popular poetry. It could also act as a title for the piece. Sectioned into four, the first is titled Healing, which is ultimately encouraging us to look forward to our tomorrow’s. Between the poems are photos relevant to the subjects of the poems.
‘That’s right – the earth wants to enjoy you,’

I think this first section would make a good companion to your coffee in the morning as positive words to take with you through the day.

‘And letting your fingers

Spread out under the sky,’

Like quicksilver, the poems leap through ideas, on memories, people, and always using the natural world to illustrate the poetry: landscapes, car rides, and sun sets.

‘Their eyes close as they remember

Who they were and why they were rebels,’

I felt the second and third sections blurred into each other, while the fourth section bought everything together, and I felt, when I had put my Kindle down, that anything is possible.

View all my reviews

;recovery;recovery by Jasmine Smith

My rating: 3 of 5 stars

Heartbreak features predominantly in Jasmine’s poetry collection and covers a break up, and the grief in the memories of time spent together. The poems do not have titles, so Recovery feels like a journal you can read in one sitting. I think we can all relate to the emotions, and subjects that Jasmine writes about, from jealousy, bitterness, and to a possible understanding, ‘I sincerely wish you happiness
For all your life
You showed me the world when we were us,’
Lines I could really identify with, ‘struggling to find my way home
Sitting on the riverbank,’
The events of the narrator take a downturn, and they begin to think of suicide, but ultimately find a way through that.
‘I’m finding the beauty in days
Without you by my side,’
Jasmine has a likeable, and engaging, writing voice, so it will be interesting to read what she writes next.

View all my reviews

Advertisements

Some thoughts on the #pleasehearwhatimnotsaying Anthology and a Q&A with @Kenyon_Isabelle

I hope, with my poetry, to make a connection with people. I have many writer friends through social media. Socially isolated through much of my life making these positive connections can be a lifeline. One such connection came in an email last October from poet Isabelle Kenyon, asking if I would read and review her poetry book This is Not a Spectacle. I was happy to do so, and gave her book a glowing review. I kept in touch, and it was through Twitter I found Isabelle was looking for poetry for, at the time, an untitled anthology, on the theme of mental health, and the proceeds of sales will go to mental health charity Mind.

My own mental health is patchy at best. Throughout my twenty two years I have had a sad soul, and my inability to finish secondary school was due to anxiety and depression. I have had very little support, and much of what I do have now is down to my own resilience (never tell me I can’t do something!), the kindness of strangers, and those positive connections I spoke of earlier. I also struggle with other issues, and SAD during the Winter months. Otherwise, I’m a curious and intelligent person, with a passion for football, and I always look for the gag in situations.

It was that search for a silver lining last Winter that led me to write the poem that I sent to Isabelle for her anthology, and weeks later she accepted it. Writing positive poetry helps put my thoughts, and worries, into focus, and I’m pleased to have that poem in the, now titled, anthology Please Hear what I’m Not Saying, which will be released next month. I find it slightly ironical to be writing this in a month that has really tested my spirit, and, I don’t know if anyone can relate to this, but when you have a thought in your head, which is so fogged up, you find it difficult to to connect the thought to an action, or a second thought. I have felt so robotic of late, I sometimes struggle to remember what on earth I’m doing at all.

A reminder in life to always be kind to yourself, to your elderly neighbours, to your family, your friends, stray cats, and strangers too. The positive connections make a difference.

Here is the website address for Isabelle Kenyon.
https://www.flyonthewallpoetry.co.uk
On her website she posts wonderful informative articles, and book reviews. I will post nearer the time when the anthology is released, and I hope you will buy a copy, and help Mind with their work.

http://picasion.com/gl/8V7J/

http://picasion.com/gl/8V7J/

Question: How did this project begin?
Isabelle: I knew I wanted to work collaboratively with other poets and it was actually the theme of mental health for a collection, which came to me before the idea of donating the profits to charity MIND. This was because I knew how strongly people felt about the subject and that it is often through writing that the most difficult of feelings can be expressed. I think that is why the project received the sheer number of submissions that it did.

Question: How did you select the poems – was there a process?
Isabelle: In some cases of course personal taste came into my selection, but I tried to be as objective as I could and consider the collection as whole. I wanted the book to have as many different personal experiences and perspectives as I could find. Because of this, I have not been afraid to shy away from the ugly or the abstract, but I hope that the end of the book reflects the ‘light at the end of the tunnel’ for mental health and that the outcome of these last sections express positivity and hope.

Question: Why should people buy this book?
Isabelle: Easy – to support the fantastic work which MIND does and to support the fantastic poets involved. Rave about their work because I believe the poets involved are both talented and dedicated.

#minireview ;Recovery Jasmine Smith @jasmine_d_smith

http://picasion.com/gl/8Sk7/

http://picasion.com/gl/8Sk7/

Heartbreak features predominantly in Jasmine’s poetry collection and covers a break up, and the grief in the memories of time spent together. The poems do not have titles, so Recovery feels like a journal you can read in one sitting. I think we can all relate to the emotions, and subjects that Jasmine writes about, from jealousy, bitterness, and to a possible understanding,

I sincerely wish you happiness 

For all your life

You showed me the world when we were us,’ 

Lines I could really identify with, ‘struggling to find my way home 

Sitting on the riverbank,’ 

The events of the narrator take a downturn, and they begin to think of suicide, but ultimately find a way through that. 
I’m finding the beauty in days 

Without you by my side,’

Jasmine has a likeable, and engaging, writing voice, so it will be interesting to read what she writes next. 

Available on KU

Amazon

#minireview Maroon Daydreams Cheyenne Raine @rainepoetry

Publisher: Createspace

Release Date: July sixth 2017

Average Rating: 4.7/5 🌟

Amazon 

http://picasion.com/gl/8Sk7/

http://picasion.com/gl/8Sk7/

Raine’s poetry ends in a final line, indicated by -, an example of popular poetry. It could also act as a title for the piece. Sectioned into four, the first is titled Healing, which is ultimately encouraging us to look forward to our tomorrow’s. Between the poems are photos relevant to the subjects of the poems. 
That’s right – the earth wants to enjoy you,’

I think this first section would make a good companion to your coffee in the morning as positive words to take with you through the day.

And letting your fingers

Spread out under the sky,’

Like quicksilver, the poems leap through ideas, on memories, people, and always using the natural world to illustrate the poetry: landscapes, car rides, and sun sets. 

Their eyes close as they remember

Who they were and why they were rebels,’ 

I felt the second and third sections blurred into each other, while the fourth section bought everything together, and I felt when I had put my Kindle down that anything is possible. 

http://picasion.com/gl/8Skg/

http://picasion.com/gl/8Skg/

#submissioncalls #getpublished @CottonXenomorph & @Breadcrumbs_Mag amongst others. 

CottonXenomorph Breadcrumbs mag Popshot Magazine Kettle Blue Review Five:2:One 
Hello. I found some new publishing opportunities this week to share with you.

These notices came from their websites and Twitter feeds, so the copyright on pictures is all theirs.

If you have any questions about getting your writing published in literary places, or would like a personalised list of places that would fit your work, let me know in the comments below!

#minireview Bones in the Garden. McKayla DeBonis @mckayladebonis


Publisher
: Amazon

Release Date: May twenty-first 2017

Average Rating: 4.6/5 🌟

Amazon 

Available on KU

http://picasion.com/gl/8Sk7/

http://picasion.com/gl/8Sk7/

I like the theme of this poetry collection of gardens, regrowth, and bones, and all the subjects they can represent. It’s well presented, with illustrations.

‘How can one man destroy the

Structure that holds me together?’

What McKayla does is plant seeds, and lays to rest the past, metaphorically layered, using plants: Wildflowers, poppies, trees: Weeping Willows, and animals: Bees. 

‘I am more than scars etched in white,’ 

McKayla writes at the back of the book that these poems were written during an abusive relationship, and I think if anyone was going through that, and read this collection, they would find parallels, and it might help give them strength, and find their own voice again, which I think is really special. 

Bones in the Garden is a curious collection of poetry, and uses many ideas. The imagery is superb. 

http://picasion.com/gl/8Skg/

http://picasion.com/gl/8Skg/