#bookreview There is Beauty in the Bleeding. Christina Hart. @ChristinaKHart

  • Publisher: Amazon
  • Release Date: October thirty-first 2017
  • Average Rating: 4.4/5 🌟
  • 147 Pages

Amazon // Book Depository // BN

Available on KU

http://picasion.com/gl/8Sk7/

http://picasion.com/gl/8Sk7/

I was not sure what to expect when opening this book, as I had heard of Hart, but not actually read one of her books, so a first for me! I would like to thank the author for gifting me with an ARC copy to review. 

While the narrator writes of heartbreak, there are poems that I feel may have been written at a later date, which gives some perspective, and context too. We don’t read so much about the relationship during, but in the aftermath of its ending. These are poems of emotions, and the barest of details, such as music choices, and sweaters, which leaves the reader to form our own thoughts. More intriguing, and telling, is in poem Drowning in Someone, ‘using your name like a lifeboat as a just-in-case I don’t feel like drowning in someone else,’

It will Come for you too, Tell me, One Truth, I will tell You , What Love Isn’t are poems where we read the narrator becoming hardened, and they can be quite brutal in their truths. There’s a tussle then of poems disbelieving such a relationship with a solid trust can be broken, with the narrator obviously conflicted. While you might expect a ‘happy ending‘ Hart pulls no punches. I would have thought poems We Get up, and Come up Swinging finished the book, but Hart really hits her stride. I loved the poems Trying to get by, on Sadness, on the Edge of Sanity, trying to be Okay, But your Guts are Prettier, Used-Air, and Broken Heart. Hart has a knack for using the word fuck in her writing, not sounding at all obscene, and adding to the power of her words. 

While poems, and books, seem to get shorter these days Hart’s book goes from strength to strength, with heartbreak at its core, and is an empowering testament to regrowth, and healing. 

There is Beauty in the Bleeding is a superb read, and if you haven’t picked up a poetry book since school, I think this one you should make the first, as it has relatable emotions, and is a well presented, well written, collection of poetry that would make any bookshelf look good.

http://picasion.com/gl/8Skg/

http://picasion.com/gl/8Skg/


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#bookreview Click. Date. Repeat. K.J.Farnham.

Click Date Repeat coverClick Date Repeat


by K. J. Farnham

Genre: Contemporary Romance

Age category: Adult

Release Date: 21 August, 2014

Blurb:

These days, finding love online is as commonplace as ordering that coveted sweater. But back in 2003, the whole concept of Internet dating was still quite new, with a stigma attached to it that meant those who were willing to test the waters faced a fair amount of skepticism from friends and family.

Such is the case for Chloe Thompson, a restless 20-something tired of the typical dating scene and curious about what she might find inside her parents’ computer. With two serious but failed relationships behind her, Chloe isn’t even entirely sure what she’s looking for. She just knows that whatever it is, she wants to find it.

Based loosely on author K. J. Farnham’s real-life online dating experiences, Chloe’s foray into online dating involves a head-first dive into a world of matches, ice breakers and the occasional offer of dick pics, all while Chloe strives to shake herself of the ex who just refuses to disappear. Will she simultaneously find herself and “the one” online, or will the ever-growing pile of humorous and downright disastrous dates only prove her friends and family right? There’s only one way to find out…

Click. Date. Repeat.

You can find Click Date Repeat on Goodreads

You can buy Click Date Repeat here:

Amazon (Kindle)

Amazon (Paperback)

K. J. FarnhamAbout the Author:

Born and raised in a suburb of Milwaukee, K. J. Farnham was an educator for 12 years. She holds a bachelor’s degree from UW-Milwaukee and a master’s degree from Carroll University in Waukesha, Wisconsin.

After relocating from Milwaukee to Hudson, Wisc., in 2011, Farnham became a freelance writer and resolved to complete her first novel. The storyline for “Click Date Repeat” is a result of her experiences (and mishaps) with online dating, through which she met her husband.

Farnham lives with her husband, three children and four cats. When she is not busy keeping up with her kids, she can be found reading or writing. She is currently working on a spinoff of “Click Date Repeat” and YA suspense novel called SPIN.

You can find and contact the author here:

Website

Facebook

Twitter

Goodreads

Amazon

Pinterest

Instagram


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http://picasion.com/gl/8Sk7/

http://picasion.com/gl/8Sk7/

Who has tried online dating? I have only dated the one man, for which I am eternally grateful, because it sounds complicated. What is it, when you send a message to somebody who has matched with your profile, that makes us continually check our phone for a reply? The claws of love!

The book. Chloe, our protagonist, is neither likeable, nor unlikable. I was concerned about some of the events in this book, such as that Chloe didn’t seem to think her ex Cliff’s behavior was stalkerish, i.e concerning, and that she was very submissive in letting the man have sex with her when he forced his way into her apartment, and as for her date when she gets extremely drunk, and cannot remember the sex they have, although she did say yes when her date asked if she was on birth control, or should he use a condom, but not to the actual sex. Isn’t this sexual assault? 

The psychic bit shoehorned into the last few chapters to explain why a psychic in Las Vegas predicted Chloe would meet a man from a town beginning with v, and they would have two sons, which the man she would date also had predicted, feels circumstantial.

And confusing, yes?

Does Chloe’s character change? No, not really. Are the other characters rememberable? No.

From an outsider looking in on the dating game, I found reading the role call of kooky dates, and scary boundary oversteps, fascinating, and there’s nothing wrong with the writing, I just raised my eyebrows quite a few times at Click, Date, Repeat. 

#bookreview ​The Haiku Zoo. Mark Watson @marknpablo 

  • Publisher: Mark Watson Books
  • Release Date: August Second 2017
  • Average Rating: 3.3/5 🌟

Amazon 

Available on KU

Goodreads Website

http://picasion.com/gl/8Sk7/

http://picasion.com/gl/8Sk7/

My star sign is Leo, so this children’s book intriqued me. It begins with an explanation of What is a Haiku? An easy to follow passage. The pictures are bright, and captivating, with the haiku focusing on the features, the movements, and bathroom routine of a lion in a zoo (The Haiku Zoo). I would say that the book doesn’t follow a story line, and there are certain pages, like with the circus lion tamer, that don’t seem to create a cohesive storyline. The Haiku Zoo is a good introduction for children to the haiku. 

    #bookreview Looking Inward: 50 Haiku for Reflection and Introspection. Mallory Rowe @petitspoemes

    • Publisher: Amazon
    • Release Date: January fifth 2015
    • Average Rating: 4.9/5 🌟

    Amazon

    Available on KU Only .99 for the Kindle edition

    Mallory Rowe can be found across Twitter // Tumblr // Facebook // Instagram as @petitspoemes

    http://picasion.com/gl/8Sk7/

    http://picasion.com/gl/8Sk7/

    The haiku’s in this book are neatly slotted into five parts. The first section are haiku of a lost love, while Section Two Us writes of intimacies, and the third Earth takes us through seasons, and starry galaxies. The fourth section Universe takes even us further, with

    we are all stardust

    molded by mother Earth’s hand

    brought to life by God

    Section Five Beyond ends the book with a beautiful haiku. Absolutely spot on.

    The writing is superb in this book. Rowe’s words delight the senses. She set the tone from the off: a hushed, and quiet night in, with some romanticism. To cover what she does in this book: our self, a relationship, the natural world, and our universe, it’s a great advertisement for the haiku, and senryu as well.

    http://picasion.com/gl/8Skg/

    http://picasion.com/gl/8Skg/

    Haikuniverse.com

    A Haiku published a day / A Project of Poetry Super Highway

    Moon full of Moons Kat Lehmann

    Maroon Daydreams Cheyenne Raine

    My Book Round up for January. 

    Pet SemataryPet Sematary by Stephen King

    My rating: 3 of 5 stars

    Well, I needed a book to help drop me off to sleep, and Pet Sematary by Stephen King did that. What few books I’ve read of King his books do have some similarities, such as having an excellent core idea, and then moving away from it.

    I was on page two hundred and four of this book and I wondered where the story was going. We have a nice enough family, kind neighbours, a hazardous road, and a resurrected cat. Then we change gears and the tenses change, King hints that terrible things are going to happen, and so they do: Gage, the infant son of the family, dies. I found at this point Pet Sematary became difficult to read, as I felt the raw grief of Gage’s family.

    In the end the book boils down to Gage’s father Louis’ inner battle to bring his son back to life, courtesy of sacred land. Gage becomes a Chucky type character and the story with shades of Frankenstein.

    Why do I return to King’s books likes a moth to a flame?

    I like his storytelling, and that his characters are ordinary folk with their own foibles, with well observed emotions and incidents that occur in family life, and in relationships. His books feel comfortable, until King whacks up the tension, then it’s plain unsettling to read.

    I am planning to read more of King’s books in 2018. That is my reading goal this year, so I won’t give up yet. Although I did, overall, feel meh about Pet Sematary.

    Also with this being written over thirty years ago there are racist jokes, and the word mongoloids, which is abhorrent.

    View all my reviews

    Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children (Miss Peregrine’s Peculiar Children, #1)Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children by Ransom Riggs

    My rating: 4 of 5 stars

    First of all, there’s so much to love about this book! I read it in one sitting. I love the photographs that are included, especially of the children, strange, and haunting photographs, which in an interview with the author included in the back of the book Riggs says were a part of the writing process,

    ‘ultimately the photos and the story influenced each other,’

    I like the island setting, the time travel, the changeling elements of the peculiar children, and the historical backdrop against World War Two too. The story of Jacob’s grandfather, and Emma, the romance that couldn’t be, I found to be a touching part of the story.

    The story itself was thin on the ground. There were parts that could have been extended, or written better. The rush of detail, threat, and action towards the end of the book was dizzying, but overall the feel of the story, the world(s) Riggs created, was enthralling.

    View all my reviews

    Charcoal mist at cotton fields: Poetry & DrawingsCharcoal mist at cotton fields: Poetry & Drawings by Eden Sleepwalker

    My rating: 4 of 5 stars

    Chapter One are poems of our elements: the night, the moon, the sky, the sea.

    Chapter Two is darker, deeper, taking us into the psyche of a mind, with mention of carousels, dollhouses, and dreams.

    “burying words, onto pages

    the cover of the darkness of the night,”

    Chapter Three are love poems in a guise of shared possession, such as in Shelters, and The Pulse, an erotic highlight in this chapter.
    The imagery coupled with the senses made me shiver with delight. There are fantastic metaphors too, and observations. Unnerving as well in some parts. With a wonderful end note.

    A Raw Meat’s song is a particular highlight, and Each Other’s Eyes is as perfect as a poem can be.

    I also love the illustrations in this book! Eden is a talented woman, for her words and her drawings that make this book a visual pleasure.

    View all my reviews

    Moon Full of MoonsMoon Full of Moons by Kat Lehmann

    My rating: 4 of 5 stars

    Outdoor persons, and deep-thinkers will enjoy this book of poetry, in which is the minuit of our natural world. A breath of fresh air, as if sinking into the serene calm we feel when stood on the beach, with the sea lapping at our feet, and having left the concrete jungles behind. While many of the poems are observational, others are opinions of the writer, and matters of the heart are written about, as well as the moon, family, rebuilding, the earth, trees, and age.

    “It is the move behind existing that starts living”

    My highlights are Poems Peach and House for Sale.

    The circle of life all in one volume, Moon Full of Moons is an enjoyable read and my review just doesn’t do it justice.

    View all my reviews

    Splintered with TerrorSplintered with Terror by Linda M Crate

    For many this chapbook could possibly be triggering, as it covers sexual harassment, cat calling, and rape culture. I appreciate what must have gone into Linda’s poetry in this collection , and in sharing her experiences. I personally identified with the emotions of which she writes around her experiences, and I think Splintered with Terror is an important read because it is so relevant to our society. There are poems that recount incidents, others question our culture and reactions, as well as others that seemed to be open letters to those that stood by, and did nothing, but accuse the narrator of these poems. A few of the poems take place in college, where I think many of us are experiencing a newly discovered sexual awareness.

    ‘People should always

    Respect each other’s boundaries,’

    There are poems too, such as in Men like you, that make a very good point.

    ‘No means no

    And people should be respected

    For their decisions,’

    What kicks in is a quality that I have noticed, and love about, Linda’s poetry is the uplift, the continuing on, and even referencing Harry Potter in Reliving Nightmares, ‘you are a foul loathsome little cockroach,’ There’s magic in her words. A line I loved was, ‘you’re the pomegranate stain on my heart,’

    ‘The best apology is changed behavior,’

    View all my reviews

    Bones in the GardenBones in the Garden by McKayla Debonis

    My rating: 4 of 5 stars

    I like the theme of this poetry collection of gardens, regrowth, and bones, and all the subjects they can represent. It’s well presented, with illustrations.

    ‘How can one man destroy the

    Structure that holds me together?’

    What McKayla does is plant seeds, and lays to rest the past, metaphorically layered, using plants: Wildflowers, poppies, trees: Weeping Willows, and animals: Bees.

    ‘I am more than scars etched in white,’

    McKayla writes at the back of the book that these poems were written during an abusive relationship, and I think if anyone was going through that, and read this collection, they would find parallels, and it might help give them strength, and find their own voice again, which I think is really special.

    Bones in the Garden is a curious collection of poetry, and uses many ideas. The imagery is superb.

    View all my reviews

    maroon daydreamsmaroon daydreams by cheyenne raine

    My rating: 4 of 5 stars

    Raine’s poetry ends in a final line, indicated by -, an example of popular poetry. It could also act as a title for the piece. Sectioned into four, the first is titled Healing, which is ultimately encouraging us to look forward to our tomorrow’s. Between the poems are photos relevant to the subjects of the poems.
    ‘That’s right – the earth wants to enjoy you,’

    I think this first section would make a good companion to your coffee in the morning as positive words to take with you through the day.

    ‘And letting your fingers

    Spread out under the sky,’

    Like quicksilver, the poems leap through ideas, on memories, people, and always using the natural world to illustrate the poetry: landscapes, car rides, and sun sets.

    ‘Their eyes close as they remember

    Who they were and why they were rebels,’

    I felt the second and third sections blurred into each other, while the fourth section bought everything together, and I felt, when I had put my Kindle down, that anything is possible.

    View all my reviews

    ;recovery;recovery by Jasmine Smith

    My rating: 3 of 5 stars

    Heartbreak features predominantly in Jasmine’s poetry collection and covers a break up, and the grief in the memories of time spent together. The poems do not have titles, so Recovery feels like a journal you can read in one sitting. I think we can all relate to the emotions, and subjects that Jasmine writes about, from jealousy, bitterness, and to a possible understanding, ‘I sincerely wish you happiness
    For all your life
    You showed me the world when we were us,’
    Lines I could really identify with, ‘struggling to find my way home
    Sitting on the riverbank,’
    The events of the narrator take a downturn, and they begin to think of suicide, but ultimately find a way through that.
    ‘I’m finding the beauty in days
    Without you by my side,’
    Jasmine has a likeable, and engaging, writing voice, so it will be interesting to read what she writes next.

    View all my reviews

    #minireview ;Recovery Jasmine Smith @jasmine_d_smith

    http://picasion.com/gl/8Sk7/

    http://picasion.com/gl/8Sk7/

    Heartbreak features predominantly in Jasmine’s poetry collection and covers a break up, and the grief in the memories of time spent together. The poems do not have titles, so Recovery feels like a journal you can read in one sitting. I think we can all relate to the emotions, and subjects that Jasmine writes about, from jealousy, bitterness, and to a possible understanding,

    I sincerely wish you happiness 

    For all your life

    You showed me the world when we were us,’ 

    Lines I could really identify with, ‘struggling to find my way home 

    Sitting on the riverbank,’ 

    The events of the narrator take a downturn, and they begin to think of suicide, but ultimately find a way through that. 
    I’m finding the beauty in days 

    Without you by my side,’

    Jasmine has a likeable, and engaging, writing voice, so it will be interesting to read what she writes next. 

    Available on KU

    Amazon

    #minireview Maroon Daydreams Cheyenne Raine @rainepoetry

    Publisher: Createspace

    Release Date: July sixth 2017

    Average Rating: 4.7/5 🌟

    Amazon 

    http://picasion.com/gl/8Sk7/

    http://picasion.com/gl/8Sk7/

    Raine’s poetry ends in a final line, indicated by -, an example of popular poetry. It could also act as a title for the piece. Sectioned into four, the first is titled Healing, which is ultimately encouraging us to look forward to our tomorrow’s. Between the poems are photos relevant to the subjects of the poems. 
    That’s right – the earth wants to enjoy you,’

    I think this first section would make a good companion to your coffee in the morning as positive words to take with you through the day.

    And letting your fingers

    Spread out under the sky,’

    Like quicksilver, the poems leap through ideas, on memories, people, and always using the natural world to illustrate the poetry: landscapes, car rides, and sun sets. 

    Their eyes close as they remember

    Who they were and why they were rebels,’ 

    I felt the second and third sections blurred into each other, while the fourth section bought everything together, and I felt when I had put my Kindle down that anything is possible. 

    http://picasion.com/gl/8Skg/

    http://picasion.com/gl/8Skg/

    #minireview Bones in the Garden. McKayla DeBonis @mckayladebonis


    Publisher
    : Amazon

    Release Date: May twenty-first 2017

    Average Rating: 4.6/5 🌟

    Amazon 

    Available on KU

    http://picasion.com/gl/8Sk7/

    http://picasion.com/gl/8Sk7/

    I like the theme of this poetry collection of gardens, regrowth, and bones, and all the subjects they can represent. It’s well presented, with illustrations.

    ‘How can one man destroy the

    Structure that holds me together?’

    What McKayla does is plant seeds, and lays to rest the past, metaphorically layered, using plants: Wildflowers, poppies, trees: Weeping Willows, and animals: Bees. 

    ‘I am more than scars etched in white,’ 

    McKayla writes at the back of the book that these poems were written during an abusive relationship, and I think if anyone was going through that, and read this collection, they would find parallels, and it might help give them strength, and find their own voice again, which I think is really special. 

    Bones in the Garden is a curious collection of poetry, and uses many ideas. The imagery is superb. 

    http://picasion.com/gl/8Skg/

    http://picasion.com/gl/8Skg/

    #bookreview Pet Sematary Stephen King

     

    http://picasion.com/gl/8Sk7/

    http://picasion.com/gl/8Sk7/

    Well, I needed a book to help drop me off to sleep, and Pet Sematary by Stephen King did that. What few books I’ve read of King his books do have some similarities, such as having an excellent core idea, and then moving away from it. 

    I was on page two hundred and four of this book and I wondered where the story was going. We have a nice enough family, kind neighbours, a hazardous road, and a resurrected cat. Then we change gears and the tenses change, King hints that terrible things are going to happen, and so they do: Gage, the infant son of the family, dies. I found at this point Pet Sematary became difficult to read, as I felt the raw grief of Gage’s family.

    In the end the book boils down to Gage’s father Louis’ inner battle to bring his son back to life, courtesy of sacred land. Gage becomes a Chucky type character and the story with shades of Frankenstein. 

    Why do I return to King’s books likes a moth to a flame? 

    I like his storytelling, and that his characters are ordinary folk with their own foibles, with well observed emotions and incidents that occur in family life, and in relationships. His books feel comfortable, until King whacks up the tension, then it’s plain unsettling to read. 

    I am planning to read more of King’s books in 2018. That is my reading goal this year, so I won’t give up yet. Although I did, overall, feel meh about Pet Sematary. 

    Also with this being written over thirty years ago there are racist jokes, and the word mongoloids, which is abhorrent. 

    #bookreview Splintered with Terror Linda. M. Crate @thysilverdoe

    Publisher: Scars Publications

    Release Date: January nineteenth 2018 

    Amazon 

    http://picasion.com/gl/8Sk7/

    http://picasion.com/gl/8Sk7/

    For many this chapbook could possibly be triggering, as it covers sexual harassment, cat calling, and rape culture. I appreciate what must have gone into Linda’s poetry in this collection , and in sharing her experiences. I personally identified with the emotions of which she writes around her experiences, and I think Splintered with Terror is an important read because it is so relevant to our society. There are poems that recount incidents, others question our culture and reactions, as well as others that seemed to be open letters to those that stood by, and did nothing, but accuse the narrator of these poems. A few of the poems take place in college, where I think many of us are experiencing a newly discovered sexual awareness. 

    ‘People should always 

    Respect each other’s boundaries,’

    There are poems too, such as in Men like you, that make a very good point.

    ‘No means no

    And people should be respected

    For their decisions,’

    What kicks in is a quality that I have noticed, and love about, Linda’s poetry is the uplift, the continuing on, and even referencing Harry Potter in Reliving Nightmares, ‘you are a foul loathsome little cockroach,’  There’s magic in her words. A line I loved was, ‘you’re the pomegranate stain on my heart,’ 

    ‘The best apology is changed behavior,’

    Linda is a prolific writer and you can read examples of her wonderful writing at Milk+Beans Selcouth Station 

    And soon in the book Please Hear what I’m Not Saying.

    Please Hear what I’m Not Saying is an anthology of mental health themed poetry, releasing February, and the editor is Isabelle Kenyon. The proceeds for money raised from book sales will go to the mental health charity Mind, so look out for that. 

    Stay in the loop by liking Linda’s Facebook page, and on Goodreads

    http://picasion.com/gl/8Skg/

    http://picasion.com/gl/8Skg/