Monday’s Spam. 

So, Monday’s Spam.

Post a link to your book, your websites, your Facebook page, or something you recently had published. Post something you’ve read recently. It doesn’t have to be book, or blogger, related.

Memes and quotes are welcome too, as well as anything motivating to start the writing week with that small sliver of hope.

No, we aren’t going to chuck it all in, we are in this together, no man is an island and all that stuff.

Share, and pass on what you’ve discovered in the comments.

Sharing is caring.

The original Monday’s Spam can be found here, as well as with more details on this weekly post.

 https://katiecreativewriterblog.wordpress.com/mondays-spam/

                                                 {•}

                     Facebook Twitter Instagram Newsletter

Buy me a Coffee!

Advertisements

Book Tour – Spotlight Stop. Hell Will Rise: The Bloodthirst Mafia Series Book One. Skyla Murphy. 

Genre Romantic Thriller

Kindle Apple Nook Inktera Kobo

About the Author

Skyla Murphy is a highland junkie from West Coast, Canada. When she’s not searching the Rocky Mountains for Sasquatch, she can be found researching every other conspiracy theory known to mankind. Her Yorkshire Terrier is usually clung to her side, but he doesn’t buy into her philosophies much. Therefore, she writes about them instead.

 Website Twitter Instagram Facebook Goodreads

Book Review. The Body Image Blueprint – Your go to guide for Radical Self – Reverence. Jenny Eden Berk. MSEd. 

Genre Health, Family, and Lifestyle

My Rating 👍👍👍👍

Amazon.com Amazon.co.uk

Free on KU

There is a giveaway on Goodreads.com for a signed copy of this book. 

Website Facebook Facebook Group Wellness Warriors Twitter Pinterest Instagram

Easy to follow, split into three parts – Jenny tells her story, then uses the experiences of others to tell their story, and finally a blue print for our own use: recipes, and yoga recommendations,  and replacing our negative thoughts with positive ones. 

I love the humour Jenny uses. It is funny how we rarely use that humour when we view our own bodies negatively, until much later when the damage has been done. 

I learnt a lot from the book. There are passages that gave me a lot to think about. With as babies we aren’t ashamed of our bodies, we don’t feel the need to diet, or compare ourselves. So what happens along the way, is it the attitude of our parents to diets, and food, or the media?

The good food/bad food idea, that is probably embedded into most of our heads, actually made me think hold on a second…

This book is relevant to me at the moment because I am twenty one, and I don’t have the metabolism that I had when I was sixteen, and my poor eating habits are catching up with me! But after a few years of trying to fit clothes that are too small, and not my style, dieting, and not liking my body, I am well on my way to not giving a stuff, and this book helped me. It points out a reasonable question, why will being skinny make you happy? Will finally achieving that certain weight make you happy?

Hm, perhaps not. 

The pregnancy parts as well were interesting, because you know, giving birth is an incredible feat, and trying to immediately get your body back to the size you were isn’t going to be easy, and I have seen celebrities ribsfive, or so, months after they have given birth, and it makes headlines. I just don’t know why you would be worrying about that when you should be enjoying your new baby. How is that attainable?

The second section of the book asks other people questions, men as well as women. It can sometimes feel like pulling teeth when asking men to tell you how they feel! Two of the questions, What is one part of your body that you love? stumped me, whereas What is one part of your body that you dislike or are uncomfortable with? was much easier to answer.

I think, as Jenny says, this madness has to stop. Body image, and the way we perceive ourselves, and others, is clearly a huge problem, and we should be looking into it, and start to love ourselves, whatever our size, and get into a healthy habit, that makes us happy. 

Book Review. Revealing Layers – The Shell of a Woman. Tye Jiles. 

Genre Poetry 

My Rating 💖💖💖💖💖

Amazon.com Amazon.co.uk

Goodreads

Author Website

A passionate poetry collection about being a black woman, among men, as well as a mother, and with poetry on the cultures of old, and new, people’s attitudes, her writing background, childhood, and love. Revealing Layers of who Tye Jiles is, an important voice I found I was compelled to read.

I like the use of a different font, makes a massive difference, and the – after thoughts at the end of some of the poems, which act as a smooth finish, and title. The Thing about Matrimony is a cracker of a poem on annoying your partner.  The dexterity of the words in the poem is amazing. One of the veins in this collection is the relationship the writer has with her partner, and the whole story of their coming to be is really sweet, and it feels like a complete history, like I really got the opportunity to get to know the author.

I think it is this, the maturity, of the poetry that made me feel I should give this collection five, not four, stars. 

A book that gets better as it goes on, eventually I stopped highlighting my favourites as I would have been highlighting each page. 

I look forward to reading book two. 

Book Review. The Little Black Book of Verse. Deleonora Abel. 

Genre Poetry

My Rating 👌👌👌👌

Instagram Facebook Website

Visceral, and mildly erotic, collection of poetry that is experimental, particularly in poem Offering, and has some dialogue. Alongside the poetry is longer pieces of writing, and photographs. Certainly a book for the senses, with tender feelings, and fruits. The opening poem Mango 

Parting the exquisite flesh

as juices moisten her fingers

If you hadn’t read the title of that poem first, you might have done a double take. 

Diaspora is a great poem about a moment in time. 

Book Review. Laundry. Vanessa Frances. 


 Genre Poetry 

My Rating 👍👍👍👍

Amazon.com

First of all, love the laundry idea of this collection of poetry by Vanessa Frances. Definitely piqued my interest. Second, I love the alternative font too. It makes reading this feel a more intimate experience. 

The poetry can be thoughts. They are a vss hashtag tweet, or sudden thoughts, with small details, and the truth in them is startling as you don’t expect too much from a few lines. Take poems Bones, Art and Woof as examples of this. 

My own book contained the same kind of writing, which received some criticism from reviewers. With writer Vanessa Frances, seeing that in somebody else’s work, I admire that. 

Sure, maybe those two, three, line poems could become something larger, or act as a prompt, to trigger a thought in somebody else’s mind, and writing. 

I like the tone of voice in the poetry. It’s, I wouldn’t say bitter, but it does sound as if a few heads are being knocked together. You could describe it as salty. Take poem Typecast as an example of that. 

App was one of my favourite poems, along with Mature, Anchor, China, Steadfast, which writes of SAD, and Infantile is a great poem. Some really good observations of love

It turns you on when I’m angry 

and I’m just not that kind

Man, Lewd, and Women are poetry on feminist issues. 

Falsehood had me wanting to cheer for its pinpoint accuracy, as did Growth, and Labels too. 

Laundry is certainly a book I plan to buy a physical copy of in the future. It’s one you’ll want on your bookshelf.
 

Book Review. The Human Condition is a Terminal Illness. Matthew Hall. 

Genre Poetry 

Publisher Bareback Press 

Amazon.com Amazon.co.uk

Free on KU 

Bargain at 99p for the Kindle edition 

My Rating 💜💜💜💜💜

Masturbation, sketching, and warring lovers seem to feature heavily in this book, with observations and perspectives from those people on the margins of society. Matthew Hall, with great brevity, gives them an iconic slant on a number of occasions. 

A poet myself, certain lines I read have never been truer, and make my own seem clumsy in comparison. Hall simply pens the lonely nights, the endless shift, and the arguments in relationships that never seem to end. 

Poem French Manicure pinpoints perfectly wondering thoughts. The book offers different views on love, such as in Another Life, Another World

1 of the factory girls used to flirt with me

but I 

was young 

and naive 

and my 

wife to be 

was 

pregnant 

Those situations, and incidents, that you don’t come across being written about often.

Early Grave 

He worked himself

into an early grave 

his family never wanted 

for much 


because he worked himself 

into an early grave 

is easily my favourite from the book. 

Absolute corker of a book, even the order of the poems in the book fit together like a dream, just as you think they’re getting a bit sticky Hall switches them up, and they dip, and they come up again with ease. 

You’re missing out if you haven’t read this one.

Author Website